Hands-therapy

Finding a good therapist, especially in a place like NYC that has a therapist on every corner, can be a daunting task. Over the years, I have heard some strange stories about how therapists behaved or responded to clients. It can be an overwhelming process to start, but with a good fit, being in therapy can change your life.

There are so many different types of therapists out there. If it’s important for you for your therapist to have a certain license or degree, go with that, but overall, I do believe finding the right fit is a priority.

Some tips in finding the right therapist for you:

1. Do you research. Scroll through the internet, look at your therapists webpage, see what they have to say. Are they licensed? Do they sound approachable? Do they have experience?

2. Get clear about your preferences, male or female, location of office, availability, etc. This will help break down the long list of possibilities.

3. Get a recommendation from a friend, family, or person you trust.

4. Ask them questions. Do you take insurance? Have you worked with my issues before? When are you available? Do you provide receipts or take insurance? Do you offer a sliding scale?

5. Trust your gut. This is one of the most important steps. If you don’t feel comfortable after a few sessions, this may not be the therapist for you. It’s really important to be as honest as you can and if something isn’t working, bringing it up with your therapist to see if you can work through it together, could be very beneficial. After this, if it still doesn’t feel like a good fit, looking for someone else might be a good idea.

6. If they offer a complimentary intake phone session, use that time to get a sense if they might be able to help. In my free intake, I ask potential clients what brings them in. After hearing a little bit about their story, If I think I can help, I will set up an initial appointment.

As a therapist, I do my best to walk the walk and talk the talk. We are all human, but my intention is to always “practice what I preach”. With this comes honesty. If I feel as if I am not a good fit, I will help assist in finding someone else who is.